Always Be Learning: 2016 South Dakota Code Camp Report

More than a hundred local developers — including a contingent from Blend Interactive  came together recently to participate in the 2016 South Dakota Code Camp.

  • Nov. 15 2016

More than a hundred local developers — including a contingent from Blend Interactive  came together recently to participate in the 2016 South Dakota Code Camp, a free, one-day event focused on programming, web development, and further education.

The event, which is the largest developer conference in our state, was hosted as a collaboration between the Sioux Falls Developers Group and the South Dakota .Net User Group. Blend Developer Tyler Harms and Systems Architect Jackson Murtha, along with four others, took leadership roles in making the event come to life.

“We see Code Camp as a great way to share valuable knowledge between developers,” says Tyler. “It’s a great place to network and to learn new things.”

In fact, two of our own shared their knowledge at the event. Bob Davidson spoke on Functional Patterns in C# and Jackson Murtha spoke on Service Worker.

This year’s Code Camp included a track of hands-on activities for the family. And it was an absolute hit. Activities used ozobots and spheros to teach procedural programming through games. The afternoon sessions followed OpenSpaces methodology, and were self-organized, relying on participation by people who have passion for the topics that were discussed.

Conferences like this are integral to both our community and our industry, both as a means of strengthening our processes and raising our community in the world of development. “Progress” is one of Blend’s core beliefs, and we were honored to help where we could as both a Platinum sponsor and by sharing our knowledge with those in attendance.

“The speakers at the event were great,” says Blend Developer Chad Thoreson. “I find it important to get insights from people who have experiences different from mine. With development you’ve got to always be learning. But let’s be honest, if you become a developer, you want to learn things anyway.”